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TECHNOLOGIES FOR CONSERVATION AND VALORIZATION OF THE ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE (061AR)

A.Y. 2019 / 2020

Period 
First semester
Credits 
4
Duration/Length 
32
Type of Learning Activity 
Optional subjects
Study Path 
[PDS0-2018 - Ord. 2018] common
Syllabus 
Teaching language 

Italian

Learning objectives 

D1 - Knowledge and understanding
Specific knowledge about advanced technologies for the preservation and enhancement of architectural heritage. Ability to read historical architectural text.
D2 - Applying knowledge and understanding
Application of the technologies acquired in the development of the project exercise.
D3 - Making judgements
Ability to autonomously use the technologies acquired in relation to the specific characteristics of the architectural text.
D4 - Communication skills
Ability to communicate the acquired methodologies and their possible applications, both at graphic and textual level.
D5 - Learning skills
Ability to rework and transfer knowledge acquired to other contexts and other situations.

Prerequisites 

For second year students, who have not yet attended restoration courses, supplementary lessons will be scheduled for the basic knowledge necessary to successfully attend this optional course.

Contents 

The proposal of this optional course is experimental as it involves the collaboration of a private company with a twenty-year experience in the field, but also because it favors the application and experimental part compared to the purely theoretical one.
The introductory part of the topic will be traced back to the illustration of the most advanced technologies in the field of analysis, protection and enhancement of existing architectures. At the same time, though closely related, new methodologies will be acquired and applied, relating to quantitative control, both analytical and expeditious, of restoration work.
Preliminary knowledge, in particular of the morphological and dimensional nature, connected with the indirect ones, is the indispensable basis for developing any hypothesis of conservation and enhancement of the existing architectural heritage.
Formal 3D dimensional modeling, such as Building Information Modeling (BIM), is not suitable for restoration of historic artifacts, since its simplified three-dimensional representation mode, based on solid modeling, results in the loss of key information morphological type. Within the course will be illustrated and acquired new methods and tools for three-dimensional modeling, able to overcome the simplifications, with the consequent loss of significant data, of virtual reconstruction by solid modeling.
These new technologies enable real-time, three-dimensional representations, which allow you to perform the various analysis activities and then design proposals in a much more accurate and truthful way.
Similarly to what happens in the BIM, or more generally in object databases, the three-dimensional model of the product must be associated with the data in such a way as to specify the different characteristics. These data must first be homogeneous and coherent, and must therefore be based on specific glossaries capable of describing, albeit synthetically, the qualities of the single element represented.
The glossaries will therefore have to be unique and as objective as possible, relying on specialist bibliography and constantly verified "on the field". Each element will then have to be associated with quantitative data, which can be obtained automatically from the three-dimensional model, which must then be "mapped" in such a way as to define the limits of individual elements and homogenous degradation areas. This will subsequently automatically quantify the preservation of the product and subsequent maintenance activities.
In addition to this classic method of quantifying intervention costs (estimating metric calculations), methods of scalping evaluation will be used, which allow, with a sufficient degree of approximation, the same results without mapping all elements and all areas of degradation.
In particular, surface modeling systems will be used, based on three-dimensional photogrammetric relief, which, unlike conventional solid modeling, allow the product to be faithfully resembled to the real in three dimensions, enabling monitoring activities over time, for example , when evolving forms of degradation. In addition, the elaborate three-dimensional model is enriched by an information system that allows you to classify each element of the model, associating its constructive, physical-material and conservation characteristics.

Teaching format 

The course is divided into two main phases. In the first phase of classroom lessons, the use of the technologies invoked will be acquired. In the second phase, application, the field studies will alternate with those in the classroom.

Given the experimental character of the course, the frequency is considered indispensable. For second year students, who have not yet attended restoration courses, supplementary lessons will be scheduled for the basic knowledge necessary to successfully attend this optional course.

Similarly to what happens in the BIM, or more generally in object databases, the three-dimensional model of the product must be associated with the data in such a way as to specify the different characteristics. These data must first be homogeneous and coherent, and must therefore be based on specific glossaries capable of describing, albeit synthetically, the qualities of the single element represented.

The glossaries will therefore have to be unique and as objective as possible, relying on specialist bibliography and constantly verified "on the field". Each element will then have to be associated with quantitative data, which can be obtained automatically from the three-dimensional model, which must then be "mapped" in such a way as to define the limits of individual elements and homogenous degradation areas. This will subsequently automatically quantify the preservation of the product and subsequent maintenance activities.

In addition to this classic method of quantifying intervention costs (estimating metric calculations), methods of scalping evaluation will be used, which allow, with a sufficient degree of approximation, the same results without mapping all elements and all areas of degradation.

End-of-course test 

Once the tutorial is completed successfully, the final individual exam will be on the discussion of a methodological report related to the activity being carried out, which must be delivered to the lecturer at least one week before the chosen call. The report will be up to 3 pages in A4 format and must be sent in digital format (.pdf) by e-mail at pratali@units.it.

Other information 

Given the experimental character of the course, the frequency is considered indispensable.
More specific references will be given in class.
Other information, as well as the teaching materials, will be made available by teacher on the Moodle platform.

Texts/Books 

- Giovanni CARBONARA, Trattato di restauro architettonico, Utet, Torino, 1996-2013 (XIII voll.)
- Norma UNI 11130:2004, Beni culturali, Manufatti lignei, Terminologia del degradameto del legno, 2004 (pagg. 17)
- Norma UNI 11186:2006, Beni culturali, Materiali lapidei naturali ed artificiali, Descrizione della forma di alterazione – Termini e definizioni, 2006 (pagg. 39)


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